• Google Bookmarks
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • reddit
Federal Government
Feds Approve Disaster Relief for Hertford County Residents PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 02 November 2016 10:14
Governor Pat McCrory's request for federal disaster assistance to help individuals in Hertford County recover from Hurricane Matthew has been approved.
 
“This additional assistance for Hertford County will help the people in these affected communities begin to recover and rebuild,” said Governor McCrory. “We will continue to work with towns, cities and counties across North Carolina to provide any and all assistance necessary to recover from Hurricane Matthew.”
 
Residents of Hertford County had already been approved for federal public assistance to help support recovery efforts of local governments and non-profits. This approval means individuals are now also eligible to apply for assistance.
 
With the addition of this county, 38 counties have now been approved for federal individual and public assistance and four counties have been approved for public assistance only. More than $61 million has already been approved for individuals who have been affected by the storm. 
 
The 38 counties currently eligible to apply for individual assistance, under the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Individual and Households Program, are: Beaufort, Bertie, Bladen, Brunswick, Camden, Chowan, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Currituck, Dare, Duplin, Edgecombe, Gates, Greene, Halifax, Harnett, Hertford, Hoke, Hyde, Johnston, Jones, Lee, Lenoir, Martin, Moore, Nash, Onslow, Pasquotank, Pender, Pitt, Robeson, Sampson, Tyrrell, Wake, Washington, Wayne and Wilson.
 
The governor encouraged individuals and groups to help in the relief efforts by making a financial or other contribution. Monetary contributions to the North Carolina Disaster Relief Fund for Hurricane Matthew can be made by texting NCRECOVERS to 30306 or by visiting NCDisasterRelief.org. This is one of the best ways to help fund long-term recovery efforts.
 
NAACP Sues Elections Boards Over Voter Rolls PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Monday, 31 October 2016 15:32
Local elections boards in North Carolina are illegally removing thousands of voters from the rolls the NAACP alleges in a federal lawsuit filed Monday.
 
Voters are being removed because of challenges filed by individuals, which the NAACP says is illegal under federal law less than 90 days before an election. However, state officials say it's legal under state law.
 
Early voting already has begun in this critical swing state, where officials and the courts have tussled over voting hours and other issues of poll access.
 
The group's lawsuit zeroes in on Cumberland, Moore and Beaufort counties, where thousands of voters' names have been challenged.
In most cases, mail sent to an address is returned as undeliverable, which county boards can accept as evidence that the voter no longer lives there. 
 
The lawsuit says the state law, and the removals, are in violation of the National Voter Registration Act. It also asks to restore the names of voters who already have been removed.
 
Among those challenged in Beaufort County was a 100-year-old black woman, Grace Bell Hardison, who uses a post office box for mail. She learned about the challenge from a list in the local newspaper, said her nephew, Greg Satterthwaite. Her options were to go to a hearing — and she only leaves her home once a month — or sign a form, get it notarized and have someone attend the hearing for her.
 
The man who filed that and many other challenges in the county, Shane Hubers, said he abandoned it after learning of Hardison's situation. He said he told county election officials he'll do the same if people have an explanation: "I've not raised a fuss. I'm not vindictive."
 
The people filing challenges in Cumberland and Moore counties say they're volunteers with the Voter Integrity Project. The group's director, Jay Delancy, says he wants to reduce the potential for voter fraud.
 
Individuals have challenged 4,500 voters in Beaufort, Cumberland and Moore counties in August and September — with more than 3,900 of those in Cumberland County, the director of the State Board of Elections, Kim Westbrook Strach, said in a letter to the NAACP.
 
However, it's not clear how many of those people have had their registrations struck from the rolls. Elections officials and the challengers say few people attend the hearings over their challenges; many have moved and haven't updated their registration, while others have died.
 
The NAACP says the challenges have disproportionately affected black voters. The NAACP says the challenges have disproportionately affected black voters, who comprise 53 percent of registered voters in Belhaven, where all the Beaufort County challenges were filed, and more than 65 percent of challenges.
 
Cumberland County's election director said similar figures there would not be made available. The elections director in Monroe County said she was compiling those figures this week.
 
People can register to vote and vote on the same day during early voting, which continues through Nov. 5. However, if someone removed from the rolls tries to vote on Election Day, they cast a provisional ballot that the county board of elections must then decide whether to count.
 
Kellie Hopkins, director of the Beaufort County Board of Elections, said she was concerned someone who moved to a different address within the county may not be able to cast a regular ballot on Election Day.
Last Updated on Monday, 31 October 2016 15:39
 
Federal Aid Coming To Hurricane Victims In Camden, Chowan, Currituck And Pasquotank Counties PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Thursday, 27 October 2016 15:33
Governor Pat McCrory announced federal disaster aid is coming to help  individuals in Camden, Chowan, Currituck, and Pasquotank counties and to help the local government in Hertford county recover from the massive flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew.
 
“This additional assistance for individuals and local governments in Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Pasquotank and Hertford counties will help these communities begin to recover and rebuild,” said Governor McCrory. “We will continue to work with towns, cities and counties across North Carolina to provide any and all assistance necessary to recover from Hurricane Matthew.”
 
Camden, Chowan, Currituck and Pasquotank counties had already been approved for federal public assistance and are now also eligible for individual assistance. Hertford County is now eligible for federal public assistance to help support recovery efforts of local governments and non-profits.  
 
With the addition of these counties, 35 counties have now been approved for federal individual and public assistance and six counties have been approved for public assistance only. As joint preliminary damage assessments continue, the governor said he is hopeful that other counties will meet the federal criteria for a disaster declaration. 
 
The governor encouraged individuals and groups to help in the relief efforts by making a financial or other contribution. Monetary contributions to the North Carolina Disaster Relief Fund for Hurricane Matthew can be made by texting NCRECOVERS to 30306 or by visiting NCDisasterRelief.org. This is one of the best ways to help fund long-term recovery efforts.
Last Updated on Thursday, 27 October 2016 15:41
 
McCrory Dispute With Cooper Results In Outside Counsel Being Hired In Alcoa Dam Case PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Thursday, 27 October 2016 15:04
Gov. Pat McCrory has hired outside counsel to argue in a federal appeals court in a long-running lawsuit over hydroelectric dams on the Yadkin River. McCrory has named former N.C. Supreme Court Justice Bob Orr as lead counsel for the oral arguments assisted by K. Edward Greene, a former state appeals court judge.
 
The new attorneys are the result of a dispute with Attorney General Roy Cooper. Noelle Talley, the attorney general’s spokeswoman, said the justice department attorney who had been scheduled to deliver oral arguments had worked on the case for several years. She said the department disagreed with the decision to designate outside counsel.
 
Cooper's attorneys filed notice in federal court asking to withdraw from making oral arguments in the Alcoa Power Generating lawsuit. 
 
McCrory’s general counsel, Bob Stephens toild the Raleigh News and Observer newspaper that his office asked Cooper to assign the state’s solicitor general, John Maddry, to the case. Maddry’s job is to handle appeals and he has extensive experience.
 
The conflict is the latest example of the clash between the Republican McCrory and the Democrat Cooper over legal strategy and how far to continue appealing a number of cases. Republicans have used it to accuse Cooper of not doing his job.
 
The lawsuit involves the state’s challenge of whether Alcoa owns the riverbed on which the dams were built. A federal judge in Raleigh last year ruled the state waited too long to make that challenge. The state appealed that ruling.
 
«StartPrev1234NextEnd»

Page 2 of 4
Copyright 2011 - All Rights Reserved
3012 Highwoods Blvd., Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27604
Telephone: (919) 790-9392